DAVIS & LANGDALE COMPANY, INC.
231 EAST 60 STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10022

Tel:  212-838-0333
Fax:  212-752-7764
SUMMER EXHIBITION                                     JUNE 15 - SEPTEMBER 18, 2015

LENNART ANDERSON (born 1928) studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Michigan, and with Edwin Dickinson at the Art Students League in New York. He is a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and is an Associate of the American Academy of Design. His awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Tiffany Foundation Grant, and the Prix de Rome. For many years, he was represented by Davis & Langdale Company. He taught at Yale, Columbia, and Princeton Universities, at Pratt Institute, the Skowhegan School, the Art Students League, the New York Studio School and at Brooklyn College, where he is now Distinguished Professor Emeritus. Anderson's work is in the permanent collections of The Brooklyn Museum of Art; The Cleveland Museum of Art; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts; and the Delaware Art Museum.
NICOL ALLAN (born 1931) has exhibited in Los Angeles, London and New York and in such institutions as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Before coming to Davis & Langdale Company in the early 1980s, Allan showed with at the Betty Parsons Gallery, New York. Known for his small scale collages made from thin, translucent pieces of paper, often incorporating pencil and sumi ink wash, he is included in such public collections as the Art Institute of Chicago; The Hood Museum, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; the Christopher Hewitt Collection at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, England; and the Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Denmark. His work was also included in the publication 560 Broadway: A New York Drawing Collection at Work, 1991-2006 (The Sarah-Ann and Werner Kramarsky Collection) (Fifth Floor Press, New York in association with Yale University Press, New York and London, 2008). Nicol Allan lives and works in New Hampshire.




ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES
CRESSIDA BELL (born 1959) lives and works in London; she is a designer specializing in textiles and interiors. She studied at Central Saint Martins School of Art and at the Royal College of Art. Bell is a member of a leading Bloomsbury family; her grandmother was the painter Vanessa Bell, her grandfather the critic Clive Bell, her great-aunt the writer Virginia Woolf, her father the artist, author, and teacher Quentin Bell. Her mother is Anne Olivier Bell, editor of Virginia Woolf’s Diaries and, at the age of 99, the last surviving Monuments Man. Cressida Bell’s work has been featured in numerous magazines and books as well as on television, and she has taught various courses on design.
SHARON ETGAR (born 1975) lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel. She studied at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem from 1997 - 2001, and at the Jerusalem Studio School for Painting and Drawing (JSS) from 2003 – 2007. Etgar also spent three summers studying with JSS in Italy at the International School of Painting and Drawing at Montecastello di Vibio, Umbria. She has taught at the Bezalel Academy, at the Jerusalem Studio School, and at the JSS summer program in Tuscany, Italy. Etgar has worked as an independent graphic designer designing books and book covers. Most recently, she contributed a series of works on paper to accompany T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, translated into Hebrew by Professor Menachem Lorberbaum, published in Israel in 2013. Etgar has been represented by Davis & Langdale Company since 2011 when she had her first show in America, Sharon Etgar: Collage. In 2013 she had an exhibition of her thread drawings; and in 2015 one of her recent work. She is in the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
DAVID FERTIG (born 1946), lives and works in New Jersey. He earned his MFA at the Art Institute of Chicago and has taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Fertig has had many solo exhibitions, including ones at Paul Thiebaud Gallery in San Francisco, Sladmore Contemporary in London, James Graham & Sons in New York, and The More Gallery in Philadelphia. His work has been included in group exhibitions at the National Academy of Design, New York, and The Century Association, New York. Fertig’s subject matter is often late 18th – early 19th century history, particularly military history, by which he is fascinated.
SAMUEL GUILLEN (born 1977). Born in Caracas, Venezuela, now lives in New York. He is a jeweler who trained with Klaus Bürgel, Susan Sloan, and Ursi Galletti. Guillén conceives, designs, and makes all his pieces in silver, using hollow construction and various oxidation techniques. Interested in classic modern jewelry, Guillén cites primitive and ancient silverwork and contemporary urban landscape as inspirations. In 2012 Guillén had a one-person exhibition Geometric Paths, at the Cultural Park La Trinidad/Secadero Uno in Caracas. His work has been in group exhibitions at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake design store in São Paulo, Brazil, and, most notably, at the National Salon in Venezuela. His 2015 exhibition Samuel Guillén: Recent Jewelry at Davis & Langdale Company, Inc. was his first show in America.
SHEILA HICKS (born 1934)
Sheila Hicks will have a one-person show at Davis & Langdale Company from October 17 through December 23, 2015 entitled Sheila Hicks: Homage. It is dedicated to Davis & Langdale’s founder, Roy Davis. Her first exhibition at Davis & Langdale was in 2008. Born in Nebraska, Hicks received her BFA and MFA degrees from Yale University, after which she went to Chile on a Fulbright Scholarship. There she pursued her interest in Andean cultures by working with fiber – the medium for which she is now best known. Hicks has been widely exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions. A major retrospective, Sheila Hicks: 50 Years ,debuted at the Addison Gallery of American Art in 2010 and traveled to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia and the Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC. She was featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, New York, and her most recent one person museum shows, both in 2015, were at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, and at the Hayward Gallery, London. Hicks’ works are in the collections of many museums, among them Tate Modern, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris; Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Museo de Bellas Artes, Santiago, Chile; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and The National Gallery, Washington, D.C. 
Hicks lives and works in Paris.

BESSIE JAMIESON (born 1940) is a classically trained goldsmith. After graduating from Vassar, she studied jewellery making at the Brooklyn Museum Art School, and apprenticed with master jeweller Robert Kulicke and Jean Stark at the Kulicke-Stark Academy of Jewelry Art. After her apprenticeship in classical techniques, including gold granulation, classical chain-making, classical settings, and lapidary techniques, she taught at Kulicke-Stark until 1987, when she founded the Jewelry Arts Institute, continuing the traditions of Kulicke-Stark. From 1987 until 2009, she taught jewelry making and directed the Institute. During her years at the Jewelry Arts Institute, she demonstrated and lectured on classical techniques and history for the World Gold Council, the Bard Graduate Center for Decorative Arts, New York, and for docents from Museum of Arts and Design, New York, and the Cloisters, the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She has had an annual exhibition at Davis & Langdale Company since 1980.


KURT KNOBELSDORF (born 1979) paints architecture, landscape and figures from life, from his own photography, and from found imagery. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he won several awards and met fellow artist E.M. Saniga; the two share a commitment to the infinite potential of the small rectangle and to the subtle variations possible through the mid-to-dark tone range. Despite their distressed and worked surfaces, Knobelsdorf's paintings convey a remarkable sense of clarity. The children, old people, strippers, and salesmen sensitively depicted in his works reflect the artist's attunement to hard-lived experience and his dedication to the power of the painted form. Knobelsdorf has shown at Steven Harvey Fine Arts Projects since 2008. In 2014 he was given the John Koch Award by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He currently lives in Philadelphia.
ROBERT M. KULICKE (1924-2007). Painter, master framemaker, and jeweller, Kulicke was born in Philadelphia and attended the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, and the Philadelphia College of Art. In 1949, he studied in Paris with Fernand Léger at the Académie Leger. Best known for his intimately scaled still lifes, his subjects include bouquets of flowers, a peeled orange, a jar of olives and, his signature, a pear. Davis & Langdale Company (then Davis & Long Company) exclusively represented the work of Robert M. Kulicke from 1974 and continues to represent his estate. Kulicke is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC. In 1988 Kulicke was elected an Associate Member of National Academy of Design. He was the Co-Director of the Kulicke-Stark Academy of Jewelry Arts in New York City until 1974, and was an associate of the Jewelry Arts Institute from 1987.
SARANOA MARK (born 1991) is a recent graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where she was a student of Stuart Shils, also in this exhibition. Before that she studied at the Pratt Institute and at Emunah V’Omanut, Jerusalem, Israel. She has been the recipient of The Lois and Charles X. Carlson Landscape Painting Residency (2014), The Pennsylvania Governor’s Award (2015), The Lambert and Emma Wallace Cadwalader First Prize for Landscape (2015), The Women’s Board Travel Scholarship (2014), and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Venture Fund (2015). SaraNoa Mark lives and works in Chicago, Illinois.
ROBERT OHNIGIAN (born 1947) has been represented by Davis & Langdale since 2009 and has had two one person exhibitions here, in 2010 and 2013. He is a collage artist who works entirely with antique papers. He previously showed with Cordier & Ekstrom Gallery in New York and has been the recipient of the Samuel Lentz Award, the Rose Megurowsky Award, and the All Media Award, given by the Woodstock Artists’ Association. He lives and works in Woodstock, New York.
ROBERT ANDREW PARKER (born 1927), was born in Norfolk, Virginia and educated at Atelier 17 in New York, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has exhibited at Davis & Langdale Company since 1999. His work is in the permanent collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Parker has received numerous awards and grants, including the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Grant from the Institute of Arts and Letters in New York in 1962, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1969, and the Ranger Fund Purchase Prize from the National Academy of Design in 1987. Parker has taught at the School of Visual Arts, New York, the Rhode Island School of Design, Parsons School of Design, Syracuse University, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine. He lives and works in Connecticut.
PHILADELPHIA WIREMAN (20th century). The Philadelphia Wireman sculptures were found abandoned in an alley off Philadelphia’s South Street on trash night in the late 1970s. The identity of the artist is unknown but it is assumed that he was a man (based on the manual strength required to manipulate often quite heavy-gauge wire) and that he was black (the works were found in a predominantly black neighborhood). The dense construction of the work, despite a modest range of scale and materials, is singularly obsessive and disciplined in design: a wire armature or exoskeleton firmly binds a bricolage of found objects, including plastic, glass, food packaging, umbrella parts, tape, rubber, batteries, pens, leather, reflectors, nuts and bolts, nails, foil, coins, toys, watches, eyeglasses, tools, and jewelry. Heavy with associations, the totemic sculptures of the Philadelphia Wireman have been discussed in the context of work created to fulfill the shamanistic needs of alternative religions in American culture. They have been shown at the Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; the San Jose Museum of Art; the Musée d’Art Brut, Lausanne; the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts; the Museum for African Art, New York; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; and the American Folk Art Museum, New York.
SEYMOUR REMENICK (1923-1999), born in Detroit, lived in Philadelphia for most of his life. He studied at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, and at the Hans Hofmann School in New York. He exhibited in New York, first at the Davis Galleries from 1954 until 1962, and later at the Peridot Gallery. His oeuvre encompasses darker, early 1950s views of Philadelphia rooftops to brilliant painterly landscapes from Manayunk, the industrial riverside suburb of Philadelphia, where he worked for years.
HARRY ROSEMAN (born 1945), born in Brooklyn, received his BFA from the Pratt Institute. He is a sculptor, draughtsman, and photographer. From 1969 until 1972, he was Joseph Cornell’s last studio assistant; while working there, he made a famous series of photographs of Cornell and his studio which were exhibited in 1999 at the Menil Collection in Houston (Utopia Observed: A Photographic Portrait of Joseph Cornell). Cornell admired Roseman’s photography and indeed incorporated images into several of his own collages. After Cornell’s death, Roseman worked as Tony Smith’s studio assistant in 1971. Roseman has been represented by Davis & Langdale (then Davis & Long) since 1979. Curtain Wall, Roseman’s 600 foot long installation at Terminal 4 of Kennedy International Airport, has been the subject of controversy in recent years. Roseman’s work is represented in many public collections, among them the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Achenbach Foundation for the Graphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; the Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts; The Menil Collection, Houston, Texas; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; and the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College , Poughkeepsie, New York. Roseman has taught at Vassar since 1981.
PAM SHEEHAN (born 1956) received her BFA from Parsons School of Design and her MFA from Lehman College, City University of New York. She apprenticed at the Johnson Atelier, Technical Institute for Sculpture. In addition she studied figurative sculpture with Angelo Frudakis and drawing and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy. Sheehan embraces the tradition of plein air landscape painting and working from life. She became a master framemaker under Robert Kulicke’s tutelage decades ago. Sheehan has been represented by Davis & Langdale Company since 1998.
AARON A. SHIKLER (born 1922) is perhaps best known today for his official portraits of President and Mrs John F Kennedy which hang in the White House. Shikler has been represented by Davis & Langdale (once Davis Galleries, and then Davis & Long Company) since 1953. He studied at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia; the Barnes Foundation, Merion Pennsylvania, and the Hans Hofmann School, New York. He is the recipient of many awards, among them the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, the Henry Ward Ranger Purchase Prize from the National Academy of Design, the Thomas R. Proctor Prize, the Thomas B. Clarke Prize, the Benjamin Altman Prize from the National Academy of Design, the Certificate of Honor from the Tyler School of Art, and a State Department Traveling Grant. His work is in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, the New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut, the National Academy of Design, New York, the Department of the Treasury, the United States Senate, and The White House, all in Washington, D.C.
STUART SHILS (born 1954) lives and works in Philadelphia; he was educated at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia College of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, and Drew University, Madison, New Jersey. He has been represented by Davis & Langdale since 2001. Shils is the recipient of numerous grants and awards including a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Ballinglen Arts Foundation Fellowship for Residency in Ballycastle, Ireland, and an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. because I have no interest in those questions…, a book of Shils’ photographs with an essay by David Cohen, was published in 2014.
ALLYSON STRAFELLA (born 1969) born in Brooklyn, was educated at Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts; and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Strafella works with a typewriter, using repeated punctuation marks to construct her abstract compositions. Her work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Davis Museum, Wellesley College; the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, Florida; and the Yale Art Museum, New Haven, Connecticut. Strafella was a Workspace Program artist-in-residence at Dieu Donné in 2007 and has held residencies at Skowhegan School of Art, Skowhegan, Maine; Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, New York; and MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, New Hampshire. She is a Guggenheim fellow and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation recipient. She has been represented by Gallery Joe in Philadelphia since 2001.
BILL TRAYLOR (1854-1949) was born into slavery on George Hartwell Traylor’s plantation in Benton, Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor stayed on at the plantation as a sharecropper, remaining until the age of 82, when the plantation was sold. In 1935, he moved to Montgomery; there he began draw on Monroe Street, typically working on discarded pieces of cardboard in pencil, crayon, and tempera. .In 1939, he was noticed by Charles Shannon, a white painter who was living outside of Montgomery. Shannon became a great advocate of Traylor’s work, and helped support him by bringing supplies and visiting every week. It is thanks to his championship that Traylor’s work has been preserved. In February 1940 Shannon arranged for a solo exhibition of Traylor’s work at New South, a community arts center in Montgomery. Shannon introduced Traylor to Victor D’Amico who in 1942 curated a show at the Fieldston School of Ethical Culture in Riverdale, New York. D’Amico showed Traylor’s work to Alfred Barr, Director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Barr purchased 16 works for MOMA but Traylor, not having been consulted, angrily returned the Museum’s check and retook possession of the pictures. Today, of course, Traylor’s work is in the collection of MOMA and many other museums; he is featured in America is Hard to See, the opening exhibition of the new Whitney Museum of American Art. He is one of the most revered of America’s “outsider” artists.
STUART H. WILLIAMS (1950-2012). Born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, Williams was a self-taught artist; he had a rare genetic disorder, Prader-Willi syndrome, a condition that results in cognitive and physical abnormalities . Fascinated by wildlife, he found his large collection of books on animals and plants a source of inspiration for his art. His medium of choice was colored markers and colored pencils on paper; he inscribed on the back of each work a narrative describing the scene he had rendered. Williams’ work was exhibited at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire in 1986, and at the Nielsen Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts in 2004. He had a one person exhibition at Davis & Langdale in 2006. He is the subject of William Corbett’s forthcoming book The Art of Stuart Williams.
MARTIN WILNER (born 1959) lives and works in New York. While studying medicine in the 1990s, Wilner started making art ; he still works as a practicing psychoanalyst. Wilner is represented by Sperone Westwater in New York and Hales Gallery in London. His work is in the collections of the Jewish Museum, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Morgan Library and Museum, the Vassar Art Library, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.  
ALBERT YORK (1928 – 2009), born in Detroit, studied at the Ontario College of Art and at the Society of Arts and Crafts in Detroit. He was exclusively represented by Davis & Langdale Company (first Davis Galleries, then Davis & Long Company) from 1963 until his death; and his estate is exclusively represented by Davis & Langdale Company; the gallery has presented many exhibitions of his work. He has had one-person exhibitions at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1982; and at the Mills College Art Gallery, Oakland, California, in 1992; and was in a three-person exhibition, Painting Horizons: Jane Freilicher, Albert York, April Gornik, at the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York, in 1989. He has been in numerous group exhibitions including including Artists Choose Artists III at CDS Gallery, New York, 1984, when he was selected by Susan Rothenberg. York received an award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York, in 1988, and was chosen by Werner Kramarsky to receive the Francis J. Greenburger Award in 2001. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York; the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska; and the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut. Edward Gorey was an admirer of York and dedicated his book The Prune People II (1985) to him. York was the subject of Calvin Tomkins’ profile, “Artist Unknown” in The New Yorker (June 19, 1995). York is the subject of a 2010 monograph by William Corbett.